Author Topic: Facing hip replacement?  (Read 985 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

biggfredd

  • Founding Member
  • Master Motivator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 15092
  • Love this chatroom!
    • View Profile
    • Garrett Metal Detectors
Facing hip replacement?
« on: September 24, 2010, 10:15:28 PM »
Columbus Ahia horsepistol has an alternative.

One of the top rated horsepistols in the US.


Check out the Bigg Elf's Toy Stash -- http://toystash.ecrater.com

And our Garrett metal detectors -- http://metaldetectors.ecrater.com

planetsuze

  • Master Motivator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4603
    • suzes.melange
    • View Profile
    • Suze's Melange
Re: Facing hip replacement?
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2010, 11:43:38 AM »
My old hospital has had it for about 3 years, too, and it's a small 140-ish bed hospital.  :laugh:

My advice to anyone considering a hip replacement is to research the different approaches well before deciding on a method that is best for you. Not to mention that folks appropriate for this procedure meet a certain criteria, so demanding it if you don't meet the criteria is not really an option. If you are a small-boned woman with osteoporotic hip bone, it's not happening under current technology.
The attraction to the Birmingham resurfacing is supposedly that you can return to vigorous sports and activities that are usually forbidden with traditional hip replacement and the healing time is less. Reportedly the implants may last as long as a traditional hip replacement, ~20 years.
BUT.
I am surmising the faster healing time they are touting must include the PT time a traditional hip replacement requires, because it certainly is just as invasive as a traditional hip replacement, with just as big an incision (10-12"). They just aren't cutting as much bone.
If the patients can return to their activities, that is great, but keep this in mind:
Quote
Overzealous [muscle] tugging by the surgeon, as required to move the to-be-preserved head out of the way to prepare the socket, may lead to a complication known as heterotopic bone formation. In this condition, the muscles stiffen tremendously because of the development of large chunks of calcified material within the muscle mass. This leads to paradoxical stiffness, which can be crippling. Some studies suggest this complication occurs at a rate of over 10 percent, compared to less than 2 percent for a regular hip replacement.
The tugging they are referring to is of the hip muscles. A rate of over 10% would give me some pause.
Last but not least, this procedure is about $6-10,000 more than traditional hip replacements. An experienced surgeon may be able to make the procedure a bit shorter (which translates to less OR room time $$$) but the implants themselves are much more expensive than traditional hip implants. When I left the surgery auditing job, a total hip was around $33-36,000 at our hospital. One of these was $6-10,000 more. Getting insurance to approve is another hurdle to meet the criteria.

Would I do it? I'm not sure I would meet the criteria anyway. I'm female, frame somewhere between small and medium, and have never had a bone density test (I know, I know). But if I did, I would have to do even more research before deciding. One real disadvantage of having a hip replaced in your 40's under current technology is that there is a very good chance you will have to have it done again within 20 years, no matter what method is used. The parts just wear out. Not the titanium, of course, but the polymer/plastic type parts.

biggfredd

  • Founding Member
  • Master Motivator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 15092
  • Love this chatroom!
    • View Profile
    • Garrett Metal Detectors
Re: Facing hip replacement?
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2010, 12:23:02 PM »
The procedure has been in the US since 2005 or so, they say a problem getting approval was basically ham fisted surgeons.
Check out the Bigg Elf's Toy Stash -- http://toystash.ecrater.com

And our Garrett metal detectors -- http://metaldetectors.ecrater.com

  

Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf